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How to Get Rid of Intrusive Thoughts: 3 Simple-to-Follow Tips

How to Get Rid of Intrusive Thoughts: 3 Simple-to-Follow Tips

Programme B
Published by Programme B

It seems to us that the more we think about a problem, the better our chances of finding a solution or preparing ourselves for possible unpleasant consequences. In fact, we don’t help ourselves much when we think about something that worries us. The level of anxiety increases, and even if you have a solution to the problem, it does not mean that you will stop worrying in an instant. And just trying to stop thinking and start playing at Woo Casino doesn’t help. What to do in such a situation?

Exercise “I Have a Thought”

When we think about the object of our anxiety, it is as if we stop being in the present tense and are transported into the past or the future. The exercise helps you get back to reality and remind yourself that your worries are just thoughts, albeit largely valid ones (but not always).

Think about what’s bothering you and say, “I have a thought that tomorrow’s conversation with management won’t go well. And it’s just a thought.” Even better, say it out loud, and you’ll feel better about getting back on track and not dwelling on things that haven’t happened yet or have already happened.

The Question of “What If?”

We often have thoughts that can be formulated through one question, “What if?” What if we’re not right for each other? What if the manager calls to meet for the sake of reducing my salary? These thoughts appear completely randomly, they cannot be controlled, because they are directly related to our worries and fears. But you can develop the habit of always finding an alternative.

Think of each of your anxious thoughts, a new, positive response. For example, assume that a meeting with the boss will lead to a promotion, and a possible tense conversation with his partner will end in agreement. Would not hurt to treat this with a little humor and imagine a completely absurd outcome: for example, that the head leaves everything and moves to the North Pole, and you leave in charge, without explanation. Approaching your anxiety with humor will change the vector of your thoughts and make you feel a little better.

Concentrating on Your Breathing

It’s no secret that all systems in our bodies are connected. If we are angry, our pulse rate increases, if we are calm, it slows down. Intrusive thoughts can give you a headache, and prolonged inactivity will lead to muscle discomfort, which will cause your body to give every signal to move.

Meanwhile, a conscious focus on your breathing will have the opposite effect: if intrusive thoughts lead to rapid breathing, calm will relieve unnecessary stress. Your task is to slowly inhale and exhale, concentrating on this process. Think of your chest filling up with air and releasing it. Repeat several times until your breathing returns to normal.

Photo by Elizaveta Dushechkina from Pexels

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